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Sally Campbell

Mediator

Up Close With Conflict

Welcome More about Sally

Welcome to my web site. Here you will find information about my background, training, and work in the field of conflict resolution. You will find links to mediation-related resources as well as those related to my activism in peace and social justice issues.
I am a working Mediator and Conflict Professional. My work includes conflict analysis and assessment, process design, coaching, facilitation, leadership mentoring and training, as well as mediation.

Professional Work

My work is varied, challenging and infinitely interesting to me. Mediation is my primary vocation, since 1985, and that work flowed into facilitation. (See tab link below for detail).
Teaching/training in the vast field of Dispute Resolution has provided me with many opportunities to travel and develop my cultural fluency. (See teaching/ training link).
Conflict Analysis, Assessment & Troubleshooting have grown as part of my practice as I gain more experience with time. It took a long time for me to be equipped to do this challenging work. (Click on the link to learn more.)
I work in a community of life-long learners who freely develop and share resources; we grow together. (See link to DR Resources & Organizations.)

Mediation is my primary vocation, since 1985, and that work flowed into facilitation.

Over the years, I have been lucky enough to be involved in mediations on almost every aspect of conflict imaginable, both large and small. I have seen mediation’s power to empower and to change people’s lives for the better by bringing closure to long-standing conflicts, by creating a space for apology and forgiveness, for righting wrongs, and letting go of old grievances.
I’ve been mediating since 1985, and mediation continues to be a main focus of my work. I currently work closely with university academic leadership in conflict analysis and assessment, strategizing ways through deep-seated or complex conflict situations...

Teaching and training in the vast field of Dispute Resolution has provided me with many opportunities to travel and develop my cultural fluency.

I have worked across Canada and in the US designing and delivering training in negotiation, mediation, facilitating multi-party processes and consensus-building. In 2011, I received Family Mediation Canada’s Award of Excellence “For outstanding achievement in the area of Education and Training”.
Much of my teaching is now with faculty and administrative leadership within university settings, for professionals working with daily conflict in their departments. The focus is on conflict engagement, and provides me with great opportunities to custom design courses to the needs and interests of the academic community

Conflict Analysis, Assessment & Troubleshooting have grown as part of my practice as I gain more experience with time. It took a long time for me to be equipped to do this challenging work.

I have worked with academic leadership in many faculties since 2009 to assist them in grappling with serious conflict within their departments. I also work closely with Human Resources in many instances. After I meet with and interview parties in dispute, my work involves meeting with the Head/Dean/Associate Dean/HR Manager to report out and strategize next steps. Together we tailor a dispute resolution process designed specifically for these particular users. Sometimes the conflict is very complicated and needs to be addressed via a number of streams. Other strategies may involve working with coaches, a facilitated group session, mediation, working the “back channels” or structural changes.
Troubleshooting - My work as a troubleshooter is a simpler version of the larger piece just described. One these occasions, I spend an hour with an academic leader/ administrative manager/ HR manager to explore a particular conflict and together consider ways to tackle it.

I work in a community of life-long learners who freely develop and share resources; we grow together.

There are many online resources, organizations and blogs to serve the Dispute Resolution community.

2015 Mediation, Facilitation, Conflict Analysis & Assessment

Work with UBC at its Point Grey and Okanagan campuses began in earnest in 2009, through an invitation to teach UBC’s new faculty Department Heads and Associate Deans, a key group of academic leaders. So began Conflict Resolution and Negotiation, which I have continued to deliver each year since. It has a new name, “Conflict Engagement”*, and has expanded from a ½ day course to 2 days, including well-subscribed private troubleshooting sessions with faculty leadership.
This has led to my working with well over 40 different faculties and departments at UBC...


ACTIVISM

I’ve been concerned with peace and justice issues for as long as I can remember. Time and life have taught me that peace without justice is an illusion, and injustice impacts us all. As well, I have learned that conflict is always with us, and the idea (from Bernie Mayer) of conflict engagement is a much more useful concept that the myth of conflict resolution. I learned from Vern Neufeld Redekop about deep-rooted conflict, and from aboriginal communities about the necessity for and complexities of reconciliation processes in turning around systems of oppression. The learning never ends.
Working in my field has provided me countless examples of peoples’ capacity for growth and change, no matter how dire or entrenched the conflict. Learning something new, or perceiving in a different light, brings the possibility of loosening the relentless grip of an ongoing conflict. What holds us back is often our sense of powerlessness to effect positive change. This negativity applies to conflicts among our larger community of nations as well.
Where power is relatively equal, and responsibility for divisive conflict rests with both sides, mediative approaches are often useful. When one side holds disproportionate power and control over the other, and the weaker side is suffering continuing wrongs at the hands of the more powerful side, possibilities for a negotiated resolution are limited. The situation calls for more of a restorative justice approach, with the wrongdoer being held accountable, taking steps to address the harms, and working to restore justice and equality. Then negotiation processes have a chance. But people (and nations) don’t easily hold themselves accountable for wrongs they commit. It often takes pressure from outside to stand up for human rights, name the wrongs and demand accountability.

Contact

Phone
250 335-2272